Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41202-8_26
Title: Automated specification discovery via user-defined predicates
Authors: He, G.
Qin, S.
Chin, W.-N. 
Craciun, F.
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: He, G.,Qin, S.,Chin, W.-N.,Craciun, F. (2013). Automated specification discovery via user-defined predicates. Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics) 8144 LNCS : 397-414. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/978-3-642-41202-8_26
Abstract: Automated discovery of specifications for heap-manipulating programs is a challenging task due to the complexity of aliasing and mutability of data structures. This task is further complicated by an expressive domain that combines shape, numerical and bag information. In this paper, we propose a compositional analysis framework in the presence of user-defined predicates, which would derive the summary for each method in the expressive abstract domain, independently from its callers. We propose a novel abstraction method with a bi-abduction technique in the combined domain to discover pre-/post-conditions that could not be automatically inferred before. The analysis does not only prove the memory safety properties, but also finds relationships between pure and shape domains towards full functional correctness of programs. A prototype of the framework has been implemented and initial experiments have shown that our approach can discover interesting properties for non-trivial programs. © 2013 Springer-Verlag.
Source Title: Lecture Notes in Computer Science (including subseries Lecture Notes in Artificial Intelligence and Lecture Notes in Bioinformatics)
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/78032
ISBN: 9783642412011
ISSN: 03029743
DOI: 10.1007/978-3-642-41202-8_26
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