Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(19970505)54:3<231
Title: High frequency production of embryos from liquid flask cultures of oilseed rape
Authors: Loh, C.-S. 
Shu, W.
Khor, E. 
Keywords: artificial seed
Brassica napus ssp. oleifera
cell suspension
somatic embryogenesis
Issue Date: 5-May-1997
Citation: Loh, C.-S.,Shu, W.,Khor, E. (1997-05-05). High frequency production of embryos from liquid flask cultures of oilseed rape. Biotechnology and Bioengineering 54 (3) : 231-238. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(19970505)54:3<231
Abstract: As part of the program to scale-up the production of artificial seeds of winter oilseed rape, Brassica napus ssp. oleifera, we established a liquid flask culture system that enables the high frequency production of freely suspended embryos. As many as 4000 embryos could be obtained from 1 mL packed-cell-volume of cells. For initiation of liquid flask cultures, four different types of callus tissues were used. Among them, the most embryogenic cell suspension cultures were obtained from spontaneous callus developed on the surface of secondary embryos precultured in medium supplemented with 2,4- dichlorophenoxyacetic acid (4.52 μM) and kinetin (0.46 μM) (type B callus). Growth curves of the cell suspension were determined and the celt suspension was able to grow in medium without plant growth regulators. Embryos were observed to develop directly from the cells without going through an obvious callus phase. When subcultured to agar medium containing 44.38 μM benzylaminopurine, about 43% of the embryos developed into plants.
Source Title: Biotechnology and Bioengineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/76289
ISSN: 00063592
DOI: 10.1002/(SICI)1097-0290(19970505)54:3<231
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

44
checked on Aug 17, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.