Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/67830
Title: An experimental study of oxygen evolution and mass transfer at microelectrodes
Authors: Wu, W.S. 
Rangaiah, G.P. 
Issue Date: 1993
Source: Wu, W.S.,Rangaiah, G.P. (1993). An experimental study of oxygen evolution and mass transfer at microelectrodes. Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan 26 (6) : 620-626. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: It is well known that electrolytic gas generation at electrodes in an electrochemical reactor can affect ohmic resistance, dispersion and mass transfer in the cell. Many published studies of these phenomena employed electrodes of a few cm in size. In this work, experiments were conducted to study oxygen evolution and mass transfer at both vertical and horizontal microelectrodes 0.05 to 5mm in diameter. Electrode orientation was found to have some effect on oxygen evolution, mainly at higher gas evolution. When there was mass transfer with co-evolution of oxygen at large microelectrodes, generally higher mass transfer coefficients were observed in vertical than in horizontal position. However, orientation had no effect in the case of microelectrodes smaller than 0.5mm. Also, mass transfer diminished drastically at gas current density = or 300mA cm "SUP -2" due to single-bubble shielding of the electrode surface completely. Experiments on single-bubble generation at a 0.05mm microelectrode showed that bubble generation could be regular under certain conditions. Relatively smaller bubbles formed more frequently at a vertical than a horizontal electrode. Results of mass transfer enhancement by passing gas bubbles confirm that this effect at microelectrodes too is smaller than the enhancement due to co-evolution of gas. (Authors)
Source Title: Journal of Chemical Engineering of Japan
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/67830
ISSN: 00219592
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