Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1039/c1jm10499c
Title: Synthesis and self-assembly of complex hollow materials
Authors: Zeng, H.C. 
Issue Date: 7-Jun-2011
Citation: Zeng, H.C. (2011-06-07). Synthesis and self-assembly of complex hollow materials. Journal of Materials Chemistry 21 (21) : 7511-7526. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1039/c1jm10499c
Abstract: Hollow materials with interiors or voids and pores are a class of lightweight nanostructured matters that promise many future technological applications, and they have received significant research attention in recent years. On the basis of well-known physicochemical phenomena and principles, for example, several solution-based protocols have been developed for the general preparation of these complex materials under mild reaction conditions. This article is thus a short introductory review on the synthetic aspects of this field of development. The synthetic methodologies can be broadly divided into three major categories: (i) template-assisted synthesis, (ii) self-assembly with primary building blocks, and (iii) induced matter relocations. In most cases, both synthesis and self-assembly are involved in the above processes. Further combinations of these methodologies appear to be very important, as they will allow one to prepare functional materials at a higher level of complexity and precision. The synthetic strategies are introduced through some simple case studies with schematic illustrations. Salient features of the methods developed have been summarized, and some urgent issues of this field have also been indicated. © 2011 The Royal Society of Chemistry.
Source Title: Journal of Materials Chemistry
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/64666
ISSN: 09599428
DOI: 10.1039/c1jm10499c
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

118
checked on Oct 24, 2018

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

111
checked on Oct 8, 2018

Page view(s)

49
checked on Sep 29, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.