Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/10255840903337848
Title: Finite element analysis for the evaluation of protective functions of helmets against ballistic impact
Authors: Lee, H.P. 
Gong, S.W.
Keywords: Ballistic impact
Finite element analysis
Fragment simulating projectile
Full metal jacket
Head injury
Kevlar helmet
Issue Date: 2010
Source: Lee, H.P., Gong, S.W. (2010). Finite element analysis for the evaluation of protective functions of helmets against ballistic impact. Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering 13 (5) : 537-550. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/10255840903337848
Abstract: The ballistic impact of a human head model protected by a Personnel Armor System Ground Troops Kevlar® helmet is analysed using the finite element method. The emphasis is to examine the effect of the interior cushioning system as a shock absorber in mitigating ballistic impact to the head. The simulations of the frontal and side impacts of the full metal jacket (FMJ) and fragment-simulating projectile (FSP) were carried out using LS-DYNA. It was found that the Kevlar® helmet with its interior nylon and leather strap was able to defeat both the FMJ and FSP without the projectiles penetrating the helmet. However, the head injuries caused by the FMJ impact can be fatal due to the high stiffness of the interior strap. The bulge section at the side of the Kevlar® helmet had more room for deformation that resulted in less serious head injuries. © 2010 Taylor & Francis.
Source Title: Computer Methods in Biomechanics and Biomedical Engineering
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/60315
ISSN: 10255842
DOI: 10.1080/10255840903337848
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

14
checked on Dec 11, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

11
checked on Dec 11, 2017

Page view(s)

18
checked on Dec 9, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.