Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9150(95)05554-A
Title: Racial variation of factor VII activity and antigen levels and their correlates in healthy Chinese and Indians at low and high risk for coronary artery disease
Authors: Saha, N. 
Heng, C.K. 
Mozoomdar, B.P.
Reuben, E.M.
Soh, H.T.
Low, P.S. 
Tay, J.S.H. 
Liu, Y.
Hong, S.
Keywords: Activation
Asians
Coronary risk
Differential risk
Factor VII
Lipoproteins
Triglycericdes
Issue Date: 1995
Source: Saha, N., Heng, C.K., Mozoomdar, B.P., Reuben, E.M., Soh, H.T., Low, P.S., Tay, J.S.H., Liu, Y., Hong, S. (1995). Racial variation of factor VII activity and antigen levels and their correlates in healthy Chinese and Indians at low and high risk for coronary artery disease. Atherosclerosis 117 (1) : 33-42. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/0021-9150(95)05554-A
Abstract: Plasma factor VII activity (FVIIc) is one of the independent risk factors of coronary artery disease (CAD) and is controlled by both genetic and environmental factors. South Asians including Indians have one of the highest prevalence and mortality rates from CAD while the Chinese have a much lower risk. Generally accepted risk factors cannot explain the high mortality from CAD in Indians. We examined two hundred and seventy seven Chinese (124 m, 153 f); and 216 healthy Indian (150 m, 66 f) adults for serum lipids; plasma FVIIc and FVIIag levels in order to examine racial variations of these and their correlates in these two populations. Both Indian men and women had significantly higher FVIIc levels (12% and 11%, respectively) than the Chinese even after adjustments of age, BMI and lipids (P < 0.01). In contrast, Indians had significantly lower plasma FVIIag levels than Chinese (8% and 9%, respectively in men and women; P < 0.01). Multiple linear regression analysis shows a strong correlation of FVIIc with serum triglycerides accounting for 4-8% of the total variability of FVIIc in different groups. Further, there was a stronger correlation between FVIIc and FVIIag in Indians than that in the Chinese (0.43 vs. 25) suggesting a greater activation resulting in higher FVIIc in Indians inspite of lower FVIIag levels. The higher FVIIc and stronger activation by triglycerides observed in this study partly explain the higher risk of CAD in Indians.
Source Title: Atherosclerosis
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47966
ISSN: 00219150
DOI: 10.1016/0021-9150(95)05554-A
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

24
checked on Dec 6, 2017

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

20
checked on Nov 17, 2017

Page view(s)

51
checked on Dec 10, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.