Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-006-9070-0
Title: Donation of surplus frozen embryos for stem cell research or fertility treatment - Should medical professionals and healthcare institutions be allowed to exercise undue influence on the informed decision of their former patients?
Authors: Heng, B.C. 
Keywords: Cryopreserved
Disposal
Donation
Embryos
Research
Stem cells
Treatment
Issue Date: 2006
Source: Heng, B.C. (2006). Donation of surplus frozen embryos for stem cell research or fertility treatment - Should medical professionals and healthcare institutions be allowed to exercise undue influence on the informed decision of their former patients?. Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics 23 (9-10) : 381-382. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s10815-006-9070-0
Abstract: The increasing availability of clinical assisted reproduction has led to an accumulated surplus of frozen embryos within fertility clinics worldwide. Couples that have attained success in clinical assisted reproduction, and have no further desire to reproduce; are often faced with an agonizing dilemma on what to do with their surplus frozen embryos-whether to simply discard them, or donate either for scientific research or to other infertile couples. There is a risk that persons or institutions directly involved in procuring donated embryos will prioritize their own interests over the informed choice of the patient to donate either for scientific research or to other infertile couples. Very often, formerly infertile couples who have attained reproductive success feel an overwhelming sense of gratitude to the fertility doctor handling their treatment. Hence, there is a risk of medical professionals exercising undue influence on their former patients, to sway the final decision to their preferred outcome. In the private practice setting, the preferred outcome would likely be donation for the treatment of other infertile couples; whilst in the case of medical professionals affiliated with research or academic institutions, the preferred outcome would likely be donation for stem cell research. © 2006 Springer Science+Business Media, LLC.
Source Title: Journal of Assisted Reproduction and Genetics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/47128
ISSN: 10580468
DOI: 10.1007/s10815-006-9070-0
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