Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1287/isre.1090.0273
Title: Conceptualizing and testing a social cognitive model of the digital divide
Authors: Wei, K.-K.
Teo, H.-H. 
Chan, H.C. 
Tan, B.C.Y. 
Keywords: Adoption and impact of IT
Computer ownership
Computer self-efficacy
Digital divide
Learning outcomes
School IT environment
Social cognitive theory
Issue Date: 2011
Source: Wei, K.-K., Teo, H.-H., Chan, H.C., Tan, B.C.Y. (2011). Conceptualizing and testing a social cognitive model of the digital divide. Information Systems Research 22 (1) : 170-187. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1287/isre.1090.0273
Abstract: The digital divide has loomed as a public policy issue for over a decade. Yet, a theoretical account for the effects of the digital divide is currently lacking. This study examines three levels of the digital divide. The digital access divide (the first-level digital divide) is the inequality of access to information technology (IT) in homes and schools. The digital capability divide (the second-level digital divide) is the inequality of the capability to exploit IT arising from the first-level digital divide and other contextual factors. The digital outcome divide (the third-level digital divide) is the inequality of outcomes (e.g., learning and productivity) of exploiting IT arising from the second-level digital divide and other contextual factors. Drawing on social cognitive theory and computer self-efficacy literature, we developed a model to show how the digital access divide affects the digital capability divide and the digital outcome divide among students. The digital access divide focuses on computer ownership and usage in homes and schools. The digital capability divide and the digital outcome divide focus on computer self-efficacy and learning outcomes, respectively. This model was tested using data collected from over 4,000 students in Singapore. The results generate insights into the relationships among the three levels of the digital divide and provide a theoretical account for the effects of the digital divide. While school computing environments help to increase computer self-efficacy for all students, these factors do not eliminate knowledge the gap between students with and without home computers. Implications for theory and practice are discussed. © 2011 INFORMS.
Source Title: Information Systems Research
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/42455
ISSN: 10477047
DOI: 10.1287/isre.1090.0273
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