Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27871
Title: The evaluation of bioactive polycaprolactone scaffolds as protein delivery systems for bone engineering applications
Authors: BINA RAI
Keywords: scaffolds, protein delivery, tissue engineering
Issue Date: 19-Oct-2006
Source: BINA RAI (2006-10-19). The evaluation of bioactive polycaprolactone scaffolds as protein delivery systems for bone engineering applications. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: The research scope encompasses the creation of novel bioactive composite scaffolds consisting of polycaprolactone (PCL) physically blended with 20 % tricalcium phosphate (TCP) particles. The supposition was for these scaffolds to be superior bone substitutes than the first generation pure PCL scaffolds due to its likeness to the living bone in terms of its composition. An additional perception was for these scaffolds to serve simultaneously as protein delivery systems to further augment its bone regenerative capacity. After the formulation of the concept and fabrication process, the scaffolds were subjected to both in vitro and in vivo experiments to test their efficacy. In vitro, the scaffolds were (1) capable of facilitating the process from cellular attachment to differentiation to mineral, (2) not toxic to the cells and (3) its 3D-architecture and porosity allowed for the infiltration of cells and controlled release of proteins. The in vivo studies demonstrated that the PCL-TCP scaffolds were effective at promoting bone formation within critically-sized rat femoral and dog mandibular defects and the addition of proteins augmented long-term functional repair.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/27871
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