Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23698
Title: Development of novel and efficient biocatalytic systems for oxidoreductions in pharmaceutical synthesis
Authors: ZHANG WEI
Keywords: oxidoreductions, enzymes, pharmaceutical synthesis, selective biohydroxylation, cofactor recycling, tandem biocatalysts,
Issue Date: 19-Aug-2010
Source: ZHANG WEI (2010-08-19). Development of novel and efficient biocatalytic systems for oxidoreductions in pharmaceutical synthesis. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Enzymatic oxidoreductions are very important biotransformations for efficient asymmetric synthesis, especially for the production of enantiopure compounds in pharmaceutical industry. However, the expensive cofactor NAD(P)H or NAD(P)+ which often required in enzymatic oxidoreductions need to be efficiently recycled for practical application; it is still difficult to obtain appropriate P450 monooxygenase with desired substrate specificity and high selectivity and to construct active recombinant biocatalysts via genetic engineering of P450 monooxygenase thus far; no practical example of tandem biocatalysts systems for enzymatic sequential oxidations has been published yet. In this thesis, several novel and efficient biocatalytic systems for oxidoreductions in pharmaceutical synthesis were developed, including bioreduction with efficient recycling of NADPH by coupled permeabilized microorganisms, regio- and stereo-selective biohydroxylations with a recombinant Escherichia coli expressing P450pyr monooxygenase of Sphingomonas sp. HXN-200, and the green and selective transformation of methylene to ketone via tandem biooxidations in one pot.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/23698
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

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