Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16146
Title: A fMRI study of the brain activity as a function of total sleep deprivation and circadian rhythmicity
Authors: LEE WEI WEI
Keywords: fMRI, brain, sleep, deprivation, cognition, auditory
Issue Date: 19-Apr-2007
Source: LEE WEI WEI (2007-04-19). A fMRI study of the brain activity as a function of total sleep deprivation and circadian rhythmicity. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Sleep deprivation significantly impairs human cognitive functioning. The cerebral response to sleep deprivation was examined with functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) on 16 subjects to monitor brain activity across 24 hr. The tone task found activations in the left precentral gyrus, thalamus, bilateral medial frontal cortex, right superior temporal gyrus and left substantia nigra while the numbers task found activations in the left precentral gyrus, right medial frontal gyrus, right middle frontal gyrus, left superior temporal gyrus, right postcentral gyrus, right inferior parietal gyrus, bilateral ACC and bilateral thalamus. The effects of total sleep deprivation (TSD) were most acute in the superior temporal gyrus, suggesting a predisposition to the effects of total sleep deprivation as well as its role as an indicator of task performance. The inferior parietal lobes and the thalamus may be part of a compensatory response undertaken by the brain to counter the effects of sleep deprivation.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/16146
Appears in Collections:Master's Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
01_LeeWW.pdf6.52 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download
02_LeeWW.pdf25.92 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download
03_LeeWW.pdf269.95 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download
04_LeeWW.pdf213.21 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

392
checked on Dec 11, 2017

Download(s)

594
checked on Dec 11, 2017

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.