Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147817
Title: INCIVILITY AND NEUTRALISATION: AN AGGRESSOR’S PERSPECTIVE
Authors: NG YAN JIE ELGIN
Issue Date: 2013
Citation: NG YAN JIE ELGIN (2013). INCIVILITY AND NEUTRALISATION: AN AGGRESSOR’S PERSPECTIVE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Job stress costs US firms an estimated $300 billion annually, and much of it can be attributed to workplace incivility (Porath & Pearson, 2010). Incivility refers to “low-density deviant behaviour”, ranging from something as innocuous as giving dirty looks to hurtful acts like public reprimands (Andersson & Pearson, 1999). Unsurprisingly, many researchers focus on examining the impact of incivility on the victims. Given that aggressors are an integral part of this exchange of incivility, this study turns the spotlight on them instead. More specifically, the study proposes a model of neutralising behaviour in the context of workplace incivility. Neutralisations are cognitive mechanisms, which allow aggressors to diminish guilt and internal tension associated with engaging in uncivil behaviour. Individual-­?level factors predicting the acceptance of techniques of neutralisation are examined. In addition, it is proposed that the inhibition of the neutralisation process causes aggressors to experience lower levels of positive affect and higher levels of negative affect. Data were collected via questionnaire survey. Individualism and mindfulness were determined to be significantly related to the acceptance of neutralisations. Preventing the generation of neutralisations was found to be associated with higher levels of negative affect. The findings contribute to current understanding of both workplace incivility and neutralisation theory, and have positive implications for the reduction of incivility in the workplace. Other implications and recommendations for future research are also discussed.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147817
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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