Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147218
Title: EXPECTING A PLEASANT OPPONENT IN SALARY NEGOTIATION: THE EFFECTS OF POWER AND INTERPERSONAL OUTCOME EXPECTANCY ON NEGOTIATION OUTCOMES
Authors: TAN CHUYE
Keywords: salary negotiation, power, interpersonal outcome expectancy
Issue Date: 13-Apr-2018
Citation: TAN CHUYE (2018-04-13). EXPECTING A PLEASANT OPPONENT IN SALARY NEGOTIATION: THE EFFECTS OF POWER AND INTERPERSONAL OUTCOME EXPECTANCY ON NEGOTIATION OUTCOMES. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This study seeks to examine why some job applicants perform better than the others in a salary negotiation setting. Specifically, it seeks to elucidate the mechanisms underlying the influence of power and interpersonal outcome expectancy on job applicants’ expected and actual deal outcomes. Interpersonal outcome expectancy is operationalised as how positively an individual expect others to respond to his or her owns’ displayed assertiveness. Participants were randomly assigned to the role of a recruiter or job applicant in a two party dyad and tasked to participate in a salary negotiation over an online messaging application. Job applicants' power was manipulated. Results show that job applicants' power and interpersonal outcome expectancy did not have an effect on their expected deal outcomes, and expected deal outcome was not a mediator of the effect of power on actual deal outcomes. However, expected deal outcomes was found to be a significant predictor of actual deal outcomes. In addition, an interaction effect between power and interpersonal outcome expectancy on actual deal outcomes was found such that low power job applicants were able to perform better. The theoretical and practical implications are discussed.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147218
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
A0125161U_20180413155436_0.pdf475.57 kBAdobe PDF

RESTRICTED

NoneLog In

Page view(s)

3
checked on Sep 20, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.