Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147137
Title: POST-TRAUMATIC COGNITIONS AND RUMINATIONS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: TAN RUI TING MICHELLE
Keywords: post-traumatic, stress, obsessive-compulsive, post-traumatic cognition, rumination
Issue Date: 12-Apr-2018
Citation: TAN RUI TING MICHELLE (2018-04-12). POST-TRAUMATIC COGNITIONS AND RUMINATIONS OF POST-TRAUMATIC STRESS DISORDER AND OBSESSIVE-COMPULSIVE DISORDER AMONG COLLEGE STUDENTS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Post-Traumatic Cognitions (PTCs) and Ruminations are two cognitive styles that feature commonly in Post-Traumatic Stress Disorder (PTSD) and Obsessive-Compulsive Disorder (OCD), but studies of the cognition types that underlies each disorder is limited. This study investigates the prevalence of PTSD and OCD symptoms in a sample of 338 and 194 undergraduates in Singapore respectively. Correlation analyses were conducted to determine the subtype of PTCs (self/ world/ self-blame) and rumination (intrusive/ deliberate) that were most strongly associated with PTSD and OCD symptoms respectively. A regression analysis was utilised to investigate the relationship between PTCs, PTSD and OCD symptoms in a subsample of 75 non-clinical trauma-exposed undergraduate students. Results indicate that 14.2% and 29.4% met screening criteria for PTSD and OCD respectively. PTCs (self) was most strongly associated with PTSD, while PTCs (world) was most strongly associated with OCD. Intrusive rumination was most strongly associated with PTSD, while both rumination types did not significantly correlate with OCD. PTCs and PTSD significantly predicted OCD in a linear regression model. However, PTSD did not moderate the relationship between PTCs and OCD. The current study informs mental health practitioners to leverage upon cognitions associated with each disorder respectively to achieve a more targeted treatment approach.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/147137
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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