Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143504
Title: Popular Monsters: Human anxieties and the figure of the monster in literary, cinematic, and comic contexts
Authors: TOH HUI MIN
Issue Date: 16-Apr-2018
Citation: TOH HUI MIN (2018-04-16). Popular Monsters: Human anxieties and the figure of the monster in literary, cinematic, and comic contexts. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Protean and shapeshifting, monsters have always been fascinating, albeit difficult to pin down. In my study of monsters, I argue that beyond its appearance and psychology, a monster is defined by its ability to provoke anxiety in the reader. My study looks at three texts, Mary Shelley’s novel, Frankenstein, the Alien films – namely Alien (dir. Ridley Scott), Aliens (dir. James Cameron), and Alien3 (dir. David Fincher) – and Marjorie Liu and Sana Takeda’s serialised comic, Monstress, and focuses on the central monster in these texts: Frankenstein’s Creature (Frankenstein), the Alien (the Alien film series), and the Monstrum in Maika (Monstress). In my analysis of each text, I outline features of the monster’s representation, or how appearance and psychology are constructed as monstrous. I then discuss how those characterisations reflect contemporary anxieties of the time by tracing through the monster’s (re)production: where it originates from, how it reproduces, and how it is destroyed. Beginning with Frankenstein, the prototypical monster of the modern age, I then move on to the Alien films, where the monster is expressed in a cinematic context, and lastly, I end with Monstress, where the monster is represented in comics.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/143504
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses (Restricted)

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