Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/134132
Title: Specific sterols required for the internalization step of endocytosis in yeast
Authors: Munn, A.L. 
Heese-Peck, A.
Stevenson, B.J.
Pichler, H.
Riezman, H.
Issue Date: Nov-1999
Source: Munn, A.L., Heese-Peck, A., Stevenson, B.J., Pichler, H., Riezman, H. (1999-11). Specific sterols required for the internalization step of endocytosis in yeast. Molecular Biology of the Cell 10 (11) : 3943-3957. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Sterols are major components of the plasma membrane, but their functions in this membrane are not well understood. We isolated a mutant defective in the internalization step of endocytosis in a gene (ERG2) encoding a C-8 sterol isomerase that acts in the late part of the ergosterol biosynthetic pathway. In the absence of Erg2p, yeast cells accumulate sterols structurally different from ergosterol, which is the major sterol in wild-type yeast. To investigate the structural requirements of ergosterol for endocytosis in more detail, several erg mutants (erg2Δ, erg6Δ, and erg2Δerg6Δ) were made. Analysis of fluid phase and receptor-mediated endocytosis indicates that changes in the sterol composition lead to a defect in the internalization step. Vesicle formation and fusion along the secretory pathway were not strongly affected in the ergΔ mutants. The severity of the endocytic defect correlates with changes in sterol structure and with the abundance of specific sterols in the ergΔ mutants. Desaturation of the B ring of the sterol molecules is important for the internalization step. A single desaturation at C-8,9 was not sufficient to support internalization at 37°C whereas two double bonds, either at C-5,6 and C-7,8 or at C-5,6 and C-8,9, allowed internalization.
Source Title: Molecular Biology of the Cell
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/134132
ISSN: 10591524
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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