Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1037/1528-3542.6.4.572
Title: What does it mean to be angry at yourself? Categories, appraisals, and the problem of language
Authors: Ellsworth, P.C.
Tong, E.M.W. 
Keywords: Appraisal
Emotion
Language
Self anger
Theory
Issue Date: Nov-2006
Citation: Ellsworth, P.C., Tong, E.M.W. (2006-11). What does it mean to be angry at yourself? Categories, appraisals, and the problem of language. Emotion 6 (4) : 572-586. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1037/1528-3542.6.4.572
Abstract: According to appraisal theorists, anger involves a negative event, usually blocking a goal, caused by another person. Critics argue that other-agency is unnecessary, since people can be angry at themselves, and thus that appraisal theory is wrong about anger. In two studies, we compared anger, self-anger, shame, and guilt, and found that self-anger shared some appraisals, action tendencies, and associated emotions with anger, others with shame and guilt. Self-anger was not simply anger with a different agency appraisal. Anger, shame, and guilt almost always involved other people, but almost half of the occurrences of self-anger were solitary. We discuss the incompatibility of appraisal theories with any strict categorical view of emotions, and the inadequacy of emotion words to capture emotional experience. © 2006 APA, all rights reserved.
Source Title: Emotion
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/130266
ISSN: 15283542
DOI: 10.1037/1528-3542.6.4.572
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