Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2012.662991
Title: Occupational safety and HIV risk among female sex workers in China: A mixed-methods analysis of sex-work harms and mommies
Authors: Yi, H.
Zheng, T.
Wan, Y.
Mantell, J.E.
Park, M. 
Csete, J.
Keywords: China
female sex workers
sex-work harms
social capital
social ecology
Issue Date: Sep-2012
Citation: Yi, H., Zheng, T., Wan, Y., Mantell, J.E., Park, M., Csete, J. (2012-09). Occupational safety and HIV risk among female sex workers in China: A mixed-methods analysis of sex-work harms and mommies. Global Public Health 7 (8) : 840-855. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1080/17441692.2012.662991
Abstract: Female sex workers (FSWs) in China are exposed to multiple work-related harms that increase HIV vulnerability. Using mixed-methods, we explored the social-ecological aspects of sexual risk among 348 FSWs in Beijing. Sex-work harms were assessed by property stolen, being underpaid or not paid at all, verbal and sexual abuse, forced drinking; and forced sex more than once. The majority (90%) reported at least one type of harm, 38% received harm protection from 'mommies' (i.e., managers) and 32% reported unprotected sex with clients. In multivariate models, unprotected sex was significantly associated with longer involvement in sex work, greater exposure to harms, and no protection from mommies. Mommies' protection moderated the effect of sex-work harms on unprotected sex with clients. Our ethnography indicated that mommies played a core role in sex-work networks. Such networks provide a basis for social capital; they are not only profitable economically, but also protect FSWs from sex-work harms. Effective HIV prevention interventions for FSWs in China must address the occupational safety and health of FSWs by facilitating social capital and protection agency (e.g., mommies) in the sex-work industry. © 2012 Copyright Taylor and Francis Group, LLC.
Source Title: Global Public Health
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/128488
ISSN: 17441692
DOI: 10.1080/17441692.2012.662991
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