Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/122317
Title: RECEIVER DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR FREE-SPACE OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS
Authors: SONG TIANYU
Keywords: Beam optimization, direct detection (DD), free-space optical (FSO) communication, intensity modulation (IM), photon-counting (PC), receiver design
Issue Date: 18-Aug-2015
Source: SONG TIANYU (2015-08-18). RECEIVER DESIGN AND PERFORMANCE ANALYSIS FOR FREE-SPACE OPTICAL COMMUNICATIONS. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: To detect intensity-modulated signals, two photodetection schemes are commonly used, namely, direct detection and photon counting. For both of them, the channel state information (CSI) and the strength of the background radiation are required for reliable signal detection. In this thesis, for each combination of photon detection method and background radiation condition, we develop an optimum sequence receiver and a simplified symbol-by-symbol receiver, both of which can automatically estimate the CSI and/or the background radiation, and detect the data accordingly. Since very few pilot symbols are used, these receivers are efficient. The error performance of each receiver can approach that of detection with perfect channel knowledge, as the length of the observation window increases. Besides robust signal detection algorithms, choosing appropriate value for adjustable parameters can also improve the system performance. In this thesis, we give an example for properly adapting the laser beam waist dynamically at the transmitter and show that with our proposed method, the system performance is improved significantly.
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/122317
Appears in Collections:Ph.D Theses (Open)

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
Thesis_SONG_Tianyu.pdf1.48 MBAdobe PDF

OPEN

NoneView/Download

Page view(s)

119
checked on Feb 23, 2018

Download(s)

148
checked on Feb 23, 2018

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.