Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/111769
Title: A study of iterative type II polyketide synthases, using bacterial genes cloned from soil DNA: A means to access and use genes from uncultured microorganisms
Authors: Seow, K.-T. 
Meurer, G.
Gerlitz, M.
Wendt-Pienkowski, E.
Hutchinson, C.R.
Davies, J.
Issue Date: Dec-1997
Source: Seow, K.-T.,Meurer, G.,Gerlitz, M.,Wendt-Pienkowski, E.,Hutchinson, C.R.,Davies, J. (1997-12). A study of iterative type II polyketide synthases, using bacterial genes cloned from soil DNA: A means to access and use genes from uncultured microorganisms. Journal of Bacteriology 179 (23) : 7360-7368. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: To examine as randomly as possible the role of the β-ketoacyl and acyl carrier protein (ACP) components of bacterial type II polyketide synthases (PKSs), homologs of the chain-length-factor (CLF) genes were cloned from the environmental community of microorganisms. With PCR primers derived from conserved regions of known ketosynthase (KS(α)) and ACP genes specifying the formation of 16- to 24-carbon polyketides, two CLF (KS(β)) genes were cloned from unclassified streptomycetes isolated from the soil, and two were cloned from soil DNA without the prior isolation of the parent microorganism. The sequence and deduced product of each gene were distinct from those of known KS(β) genes and, by phylogenetic analysis, belonged to antibiotic-producing PKS gene clusters. Hybrid PKS gene cassettes were constructed with each novel KS(β) gene substituted for the actI-ORF2 or tcmL KS(β) subunit genes, along with the respective actI-ORF1 or tcmK KS(α), tcmM ACP, and tcmN cyclase genes, and were found to produce an octaketide or decaketide product characteristic of the ones known to be made by the heterologous KS(α), gene partner. Since substantially less than 1% of the microorganisms present in soil are thought to be cultivatable by standard methods, this work demonstrates a potential way to gain access to a more extensive range of microbial molecular diversity and to biosynthetic pathways whose products can be tested for biological applications.
Source Title: Journal of Bacteriology
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/111769
ISSN: 00219193
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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