Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-011-1181-1
Title: Unmet psychosocial needs among cancer patients undergoing ambulatory care in Singapore
Authors: Ng, R.
Verkooijen, H.M. 
Ooi, L.L.
Koh, W.-P. 
Keywords: Cancer
Oncology
Unmet needs
Unmet psychosocial needs
Issue Date: May-2012
Citation: Ng, R., Verkooijen, H.M., Ooi, L.L., Koh, W.-P. (2012-05). Unmet psychosocial needs among cancer patients undergoing ambulatory care in Singapore. Supportive Care in Cancer 20 (5) : 1049-1056. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1007/s00520-011-1181-1
Abstract: Purpose Previous studies have demonstrated high prevalence of unmet psychosocial needs among cancer patients, but few were conducted among Asians. In this crosssectional study, we investigated the prevalence of and factors associated with unmet psychosocial needs among cancer patients undergoing ambulatory care at a cancer centre in Singapore. Method We conducted a cross-sectional study among 535 breast, gynaecological and colorectal cancer patients (response rate, 76%) using a modified version of the Cancer Survivors' Unmet Needs measure questionnaire, to assess the prevalence of patients' needs for disease information and social support, physical needs, financial needs and psychological needs, and the extent to which needs were met. Logistic regression analysis was used to identify demographic or disease characteristics associated with unmet needs. Results Seventy-five per cent of patients reported having any unmet needs, with disease information needs being most prevalent (61.5%) followed by financial (40.2%), social support (39.7%), psychological (27.3%) and physical (26.1%) needs. Factors independently associated with having high level of unmet needs were age below 60 years, ethnic minority, advanced disease and recent diagnosis. Conclusion The prevalence of unmet psychosocial needs among cancer patients in ambulatory care is generally high. Young patients with disease recently diagnosed at advanced stage will benefit from additional support. © Springer-Verlag 2011.
Source Title: Supportive Care in Cancer
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/109080
ISSN: 09414355
DOI: 10.1007/s00520-011-1181-1
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