Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0046535
Title: Estrogen Receptor Status in Relation to Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer-A Population-Based Cohort Study
Authors: Sandberg, M.E.C.
Hall, P.
Hartman, M. 
Johansson, A.L.V.
Eloranta, S.
Ploner, A.
Czene, K.
Issue Date: 8-Oct-2012
Source: Sandberg, M.E.C., Hall, P., Hartman, M., Johansson, A.L.V., Eloranta, S., Ploner, A., Czene, K. (2012-10-08). Estrogen Receptor Status in Relation to Risk of Contralateral Breast Cancer-A Population-Based Cohort Study. PLoS ONE 7 (10) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0046535
Abstract: Background: It is unclear whether estrogen receptor (ER)-status of first primary breast cancer is associated with risk of metachronous (non-simultaneous) contralateral breast cancer (CBC), and to what extent endocrine therapy affects this association. Methods: We studied the effect of ER-status of the first cancer on the risk of CBC overall, and for different ER-subtypes of CBC, using a large, population-based cohort. The cohort consisted of all women diagnosed with breast cancer in the Stockholm region 1976-2005; 25715 patients, of whom 940 suffered CBC. The relative risk was analyzed mainly using standardized incidence ratios (SIR). Results: Women with breast cancer had a doubled risk of CBC compared to the risk of breast cancer in the general female population (SIR: 2.22 [2.08-2.36]), for women with a previous ER-positive cancer: SIR = 2.30 (95% CI:2.11-2.50) and for women with a previous ER-negative cancer: SIR = 2.17 (95% CI:1.82-2.55). The relative risk of ER-positive and ER-negative CBC was very similar for women with ER-positive first cancer (SIR = 2.02 [95%CI: 1.80-2.27] and SIR = 1.89 [95%CI: 1.46-2.41] respectively) while for patients with ER-negative first cancer the relative risk was significantly different (SIR = 1.27 [95% CI:0.94-1.68] for ER-positive CBC and SIR = 4.96 [95%CI:3.67-6.56] for ER-negative CBC). Patients with ER-positive first cancer who received hormone therapy still had a significantly higher risk of CBC than the risk of breast cancer for the general female population (SIR = 1.74 [95% CI:1.47-2.03]). Conclusion: The risk of CBC for a breast cancer patient is increased to about two-fold, compared to the risk of breast cancer in the general female population. This excess risk decreases, but does not disappear, with adjuvant endocrine therapy. Patients with ER-positive first cancers have an increased risk for CBC of both ER subtypes, while patients with ER-negative first cancer have a specifically increased risk of ER-negative CBC. © 2012 Sandberg et al.
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108919
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0046535
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