Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073243
Title: Causes of Mortality for Indonesian Hajj Pilgrims: Comparison between Routine Death Certificate and Verbal Autopsy Findings
Authors: Pane, M.
Imari, S.
Alwi, Q.
Nyoman Kandun, I.
Cook, A.R. 
Samaan, G.
Issue Date: 21-Aug-2013
Citation: Pane, M., Imari, S., Alwi, Q., Nyoman Kandun, I., Cook, A.R., Samaan, G. (2013-08-21). Causes of Mortality for Indonesian Hajj Pilgrims: Comparison between Routine Death Certificate and Verbal Autopsy Findings. PLoS ONE 8 (8) : -. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1371/journal.pone.0073243
Abstract: Background:Indonesia provides the largest single source of pilgrims for the Hajj (10%). In the last two decades, mortality rates for Indonesian pilgrims ranged between 200-380 deaths per 100,000 pilgrims over the 10-week Hajj period. Reasons for high mortality are not well understood. In 2008, verbal autopsy was introduced to complement routine death certificates to explore cause of death diagnoses. This study presents the patterns and causes of death for Indonesian pilgrims, and compares routine death certificates to verbal autopsy findings.Methods:Public health surveillance was conducted by Indonesian public health authorities accompanying pilgrims to Saudi Arabia, with daily reporting of hospitalizations and deaths. Surveillance data from 2008 were analyzed for timing, geographic location and site of death. Percentages for each cause of death category from death certificates were compared to that from verbal autopsy.Results:In 2008, 206,831 Indonesian undertook the Hajj. There were 446 deaths, equivalent to 1,968 deaths per 100,000 pilgrim years. Most pilgrims died in Mecca (68%) and Medinah (24%). There was no statistically discernible difference in the total mortality risk for the two pilgrimage routes (Mecca or Medinah first), but the number of deaths peaked earlier for those traveling to Mecca first (p=0.002). Most deaths were due to cardiovascular (66%) and respiratory (28%) diseases. A greater proportion of deaths were attributed to cardiovascular disease by death certificate compared to the verbal autopsy method (p
Source Title: PLoS ONE
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/108890
ISSN: 19326203
DOI: 10.1371/journal.pone.0073243
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