Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1116/1.1692292
Title: Correlated structural and magnetization reversal studies on epitaxial Ni films grown with molecular beam epitaxy and with sputtering
Authors: Zhang, Z.
Lukaszew, R.A.
Cionca, C.
Pan, X.
Clarke, R.
Yeadon, M. 
Zambano, A.
Walko, D.
Dufresne, E.
Te Velthius, S.
Issue Date: Jul-2004
Citation: Zhang, Z., Lukaszew, R.A., Cionca, C., Pan, X., Clarke, R., Yeadon, M., Zambano, A., Walko, D., Dufresne, E., Te Velthius, S. (2004-07). Correlated structural and magnetization reversal studies on epitaxial Ni films grown with molecular beam epitaxy and with sputtering. Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces and Films 22 (4) : 1868-1872. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1116/1.1692292
Abstract: The correlation between Ni film structure, grown with molecular beam epitaxy (MBE) and dc magnetron sputtering, and the azimuthal dependence of the magnetization reversal, was analyzed. It was found that the aggressive field in the sputtered (001) Ni films showed fourfold azimuthal symmetry whle MBE(001) Ni grown films showed an additional uniaxial symmetry superimposed to the fourfold symmetry. It was observed that both type of films had epitaxial growth and excellent strain less crystalline quality, differing only in magnetic anisotropy. The results show that the magnetic anisotropy difference between the two films is due to varying interfacial structure and/ or morphology due to the formation of a NiO interfacial layer.
Source Title: Journal of Vacuum Science and Technology A: Vacuum, Surfaces and Films
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/107258
ISSN: 07342101
DOI: 10.1116/1.1692292
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