Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2009.0015
Title: New Guinea highland origin of a widespread arthropod supertramp
Authors: Balke, M.
Ribera, I.
Hendrich, L.
Miller, M.A.
Sagata, K.
Posman, A.
Vogler, A.P.
Meier, R. 
Keywords: Evolution of Oceanian fauna
Molecular phylogeny
Origin of widespread species
Rhantus colonization of Wallacea
Wallace's line
Issue Date: 7-Jul-2009
Citation: Balke, M., Ribera, I., Hendrich, L., Miller, M.A., Sagata, K., Posman, A., Vogler, A.P., Meier, R. (2009-07-07). New Guinea highland origin of a widespread arthropod supertramp. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 276 (1666) : 2359-2367. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1098/rspb.2009.0015
Abstract: The biologically and geologically extremely diverse archipelagos of Wallacea, Australasia and Oceania have long stimulated ecologists and evolutionary biologists. Yet, few molecular phylogenetic analyses of the terrestrial fauna have been carried out to understand the evolutionary patterns. We use dense taxon and character sampling of more than 7000 bp DNA sequence data for a group of diving beetles ranging from the Holarctic throughout Asia to as far east as French Polynesia.We here show that an ecologically diverse, common and widespread (Portugal to New Zealand) arthropod supertramp species originated in the highlands of New Guinea, ca 6.0-2.7 Myr ago. The approximately 25 closely related species are narrow endemics in Australasia/Oceania. The ancestor of this clade colonized that region from Eurasia ca 9-7 Myr ago. Our finding contradicts the widely held view of local endemism as an evolutionary dead end, as we find multiple peripatric speciation events within the Pleistocene and complex colonization patterns between the Oriental and Australian zoogeographic regions, including the recolonization of Eurasia, jumping across Wallace's line and colonization of continental Australia out of New Guinea. Our study strongly highlights the importance of dispersal over water gaps in shaping biogeographic patterns. © 2009 The Royal Society.
Source Title: Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/101205
ISSN: 09628452
DOI: 10.1098/rspb.2009.0015
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