Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1021/la981230i
DC FieldValue
dc.titleThermal-induced chemical modification of palladium acetate on the submicrometer scale by in situ scanning thermal microscopy
dc.contributor.authorNg, H.T.
dc.contributor.authorChew, V.H.T.
dc.contributor.authorLoh, M.F.C.
dc.contributor.authorTan, K.L.
dc.contributor.authorChan, L.
dc.contributor.authorLi, S.F.Y.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-16T08:46:09Z
dc.date.available2014-10-16T08:46:09Z
dc.date.issued1999-03-30
dc.identifier.citationNg, H.T., Chew, V.H.T., Loh, M.F.C., Tan, K.L., Chan, L., Li, S.F.Y. (1999-03-30). Thermal-induced chemical modification of palladium acetate on the submicrometer scale by in situ scanning thermal microscopy. Langmuir 15 (7) : 2425-2430. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1021/la981230i
dc.identifier.issn07437463
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/95298
dc.description.abstractIn this paper, a new method for studying thermally induced surface reactions with submicrometer scale resolution is discussed. Thermal-induced chemical modification of palladium acetate (Pd(OAc)2) has been successfully demonstrated via a scanning thermal microscope that permits sequential temperature ramping of its resistive thermal probe. In-situ thermal conductivity contrast and dynamic morphological evolutions of the thermal decomposition process have been monitored with spatial resolution in the submicrometer length scale regime to reveal interesting phenomena whereby drastic variations in both thermal conductivity contrast and topography were observed at its thermal degradation temperature range. At 523 K, thermal-induced modification was found to occur predominantly at the peripherals of the Pd(OAc)2 islands. However, almost instantaneous transformation to palladium (Pd) metal took place locally at 553 K within the thermal probe's dwell time of ca. 5 ms at each pixel point. The chemical identity of the newly formed Pd could be identified conveniently due to its distinct thermal conductivity contrast with its surroundings and subsequently confirmed by X-ray photoelectron spectroscopic (XPS) studies.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1021/la981230i
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentCHEMISTRY
dc.contributor.departmentPHYSICS
dc.description.doi10.1021/la981230i
dc.description.sourcetitleLangmuir
dc.description.volume15
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page2425-2430
dc.description.codenLANGD
dc.identifier.isiut000079541000029
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

3
checked on Dec 1, 2021

WEB OF SCIENCETM
Citations

3
checked on Nov 24, 2021

Page view(s)

109
checked on Dec 2, 2021

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.