Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/94016
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dc.titleIn situ atomic force microscopy of the electrochemical dissolution of a copper grain
dc.contributor.authorChan, H.S.O.
dc.contributor.authorHo, P.K.H.
dc.contributor.authorZhou, L.
dc.contributor.authorLuo, N.
dc.contributor.authorNg, S.C.
dc.contributor.authorLi, S.F.Y.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-16T08:31:06Z
dc.date.available2014-10-16T08:31:06Z
dc.date.issued1996-05-15
dc.identifier.citationChan, H.S.O.,Ho, P.K.H.,Zhou, L.,Luo, N.,Ng, S.C.,Li, S.F.Y. (1996-05-15). In situ atomic force microscopy of the electrochemical dissolution of a copper grain. Langmuir 12 (10) : 2580-2586. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.issn07437463
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/94016
dc.description.abstractDynamic evolution of the submicrometer surface morphology of a copper grain undergoing electrodissolution in the "electroetching regime" has been monitored by in situ atomic force microscopy. Images obtained for a nominal current density of 400 μA cm-2 indicate rapid etching into the surface to reveal well-defined crystallographic faces. The thermodynamically most stable {111} facets develop first, forming the initial primary dissolution faces; but as dissolution progresses, they are replaced by stably dissolving {211}and{221} facets. Hence, surface morphology can either be thermodynamically or kinetically controlled. Local current density is distributed inhomogeneously at the submicrometer level, being 1 order of magnitude larger than the global average at some locations. Identical crystallographic facets do not etch at the same rate and the dissolving facets typically evolve in a complex temporal-spatial manner. This behavior may be related to nonlinear pattern formation. Images obtained for a lower current density of 20 μA cm-2 provide unequivocal evidence of a surface recrystallization phenomenon concurrent with the anodic dissolution process. The surface reordering extends up to the submicrometer length scale and leads to development of smooth facets.
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMATERIALS SCIENCE
dc.contributor.departmentCHEMISTRY
dc.description.sourcetitleLangmuir
dc.description.volume12
dc.description.issue10
dc.description.page2580-2586
dc.description.codenLANGD
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
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