Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2006.01.003
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dc.titlepH- and temperature-responsive hydrogels from crosslinked triblock copolymers prepared via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerizations
dc.contributor.authorXu, F.-J.
dc.contributor.authorKang, E.-T.
dc.contributor.authorNeoh, K.-G.
dc.date.accessioned2014-10-09T06:57:26Z
dc.date.available2014-10-09T06:57:26Z
dc.date.issued2006-05
dc.identifier.citationXu, F.-J., Kang, E.-T., Neoh, K.-G. (2006-05). pH- and temperature-responsive hydrogels from crosslinked triblock copolymers prepared via consecutive atom transfer radical polymerizations. Biomaterials 27 (14) : 2787-2797. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2006.01.003
dc.identifier.issn01429612
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/89758
dc.description.abstractWell-defined poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate)-b-poly(N-isopropylacrylamide)-b-poly((2-dimethyl amino)ethyl methacrylate-co-2-hydroxyethyl methacrylate), or P(DMAEMA-co-HEMA)-b-P(NIPAAm)- b-P(DMAEMA-co-HEMA), triblock copolymers were synthesized by consecutive atom transfer radical polymerizations (ATRPs), using ethylene glycol di-2-bromoisobutyrate (Br-EG-Br) as the starting ATRP initiator. The hydroxyl groups of the incorporated HEMA units were used as crosslinking sites for the preparation of smart hydrogels. The so-prepared hydrogels exhibited both temperature- and pH-sensitive behavior derived, respectively, and independently, from the P(NIPAAm) blocks and P(DMAEMA) units, in the crosslinked matrices. The hydrogels exhibited a lower critical solution temperature (LCST) of 31-32°C in aqueous media of pH 1-7, not unlike that of the P(NIPAAm) homopolymer. The swelling ratios and swelling/deswelling kinetics of the hydrogels depended strongly on pH and temperature of the medium. The copolymers were characterized by gel-permeation chromatography, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and 1H nuclear magnetic resonance (1H NMR) spectroscopy. The resultant stimuli-responsive hydrogels were characterized by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). These stimuli-responsive hydrogels will have potential applications in biomedical areas, such as tissue engineering and drug delivery. © 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.biomaterials.2006.01.003
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectATRP
dc.subjectDMAEMA
dc.subjectHydrogel
dc.subjectNIPAAm
dc.subjectpH-responsive
dc.subjectTemperature-sensitive
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentCHEMICAL & BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.biomaterials.2006.01.003
dc.description.sourcetitleBiomaterials
dc.description.volume27
dc.description.issue14
dc.description.page2787-2797
dc.description.codenBIMAD
dc.identifier.isiut000236168500001
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