Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1504/IJTM.2008.019382
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dc.titleSystems, components and modular design: The case of the US semiconductor industry
dc.contributor.authorFunk, J.L.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-18T04:54:08Z
dc.date.available2014-06-18T04:54:08Z
dc.date.issued2008-07
dc.identifier.citationFunk, J.L. (2008-07). Systems, components and modular design: The case of the US semiconductor industry. International Journal of Technology Management 42 (4) : 387-413. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1504/IJTM.2008.019382
dc.identifier.issn02675730
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/67728
dc.description.abstractWhile the existing research on modular designs and vertical disintegration primarily focuses on a single industry, this paper looks at the interaction between modular design and vertical disintegration in both the electronic systems (e.g., computers, telecommunications, broadcasting) and electronic components (i.e., semiconductors) industries. It uses data on the top-ranked firms in the US semiconductor industry to show how this interaction has evolved over the last 50 years in two ways. First, it shows how the development of 'industry standard' components for use in 'open system' modular designs of electronic systems facilitated the vertical disintegration between electronic systems and component suppliers. Second, it shows how the vertical disintegration in the electronic components industry (between semiconductor design houses and foundries) in the 1980s strengthened modular designs at the electronic systems level and further encouraged the vertical disintegration between system and component suppliers by reducing the entry barriers for design houses and foundries. These results have implications for research on the industry dynamics that result from the interactions between modular designs, design rules and several aspects of the Product Life Cycle (PLC), including dominant designs, increasing returns to scale and firm shakeouts and industry consolidation. Copyright © 2008 Inderscience Enterprises Ltd.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1504/IJTM.2008.019382
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectDesign houses
dc.subjectDesign rules
dc.subjectFoundries
dc.subjectIndustry standard components
dc.subjectModular design
dc.subjectOpen systems
dc.subjectSemiconductor industry
dc.subjectSemiconductors
dc.subjectVertical disintegration
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDIVISION OF ENGINEERING AND TECH MGT
dc.description.doi10.1504/IJTM.2008.019382
dc.description.sourcetitleInternational Journal of Technology Management
dc.description.volume42
dc.description.issue4
dc.description.page387-413
dc.description.codenIJTME
dc.identifier.isiut000258680600004
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