Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME09109
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dc.titleCharacterization of active microbes in a full-scale anaerobic fluidized bed reactor treating phenolic wastewater
dc.contributor.authorChen, C.-L.
dc.contributor.authorWu, J.-H.
dc.contributor.authorTseng, I.-C.
dc.contributor.authorLiang, T.-M.
dc.contributor.authorLiu, W.-T.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-17T10:14:33Z
dc.date.available2014-06-17T10:14:33Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationChen, C.-L., Wu, J.-H., Tseng, I.-C., Liang, T.-M., Liu, W.-T. (2009). Characterization of active microbes in a full-scale anaerobic fluidized bed reactor treating phenolic wastewater. Microbes and Environments 24 (2) : 144-153. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME09109
dc.identifier.issn13426311
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/67624
dc.description.abstractThis study investigated the active microbial community in a full-scale granular activated carbon-anaerobic fluidized bed (GAC-AFB) reactor treating wastewater from the manufacturing of phenolic resin, using 16S rRNA-based molecular analyses. The results of cDNA from 16S rRNA revealed that Methanosaeta-related (83.9% of archaeal clones) and Syntrophorhabdaceae (formerly named Deltaproteobacteria group TA)-related (68.9% of bacterial clones) microorganisms were as the most predominant populations in the phenol-degrading GAC-AFB reactor. The high abundance of Syntrophorhabdaceae was supported by a terminal restriction fragment length polymorphism (T-RFLP) analysis, which showed that a Syntrophorhabdaceae-like fragment of 119 bp (∼80% of total fragments) was the most predominant phylotype. Furthermore, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analyses suggested that Syntrophus-and Chloroflexi-like cells were also in high abundance in the GAC biofilm. A non-layered structure of microorganisms was found in the GAC biofilm, where Methanosaeta (thick filamentous), Syntrophorhabdaceae (oval-shaped), Syntrophus (small rods) and Chloroflexi (thin-filamentous) were randomly distributed with high abundance. These findings greatly improve our understanding of the diversity and distribution of microbial populations in a full-scale mesophilic bioreactor treating an actual phenol-containing waste stream.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1264/jsme2.ME09109
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAnaerobic
dc.subjectFISH
dc.subjectMicrobial
dc.subjectPhenol
dc.subjectPhylogenetic
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDIVISION OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & ENGG
dc.contributor.departmentTROPICAL MARINE SCIENCE INSTITUTE
dc.description.doi10.1264/jsme2.ME09109
dc.description.sourcetitleMicrobes and Environments
dc.description.volume24
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page144-153
dc.identifier.isiut000273264500009
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