Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1002/1521-3935(20010301)202:6<785
Title: Water-soluble polyaniline from γ-ray-induced N-acylation graft copolymerization with acrylic acid in the emeraldine state
Authors: Chen, Y.
Kang, E.T. 
Neoh, K.G. 
Ma, Z.H.
Tan, K.L. 
Issue Date: 18-Apr-2001
Citation: Chen, Y.,Kang, E.T.,Neoh, K.G.,Ma, Z.H.,Tan, K.L. (2001-04-18). Water-soluble polyaniline from γ-ray-induced N-acylation graft copolymerization with acrylic acid in the emeraldine state. Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics 202 (6) : 785-793. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1002/1521-3935(20010301)202:6<785
Abstract: The effect of γ-ray irradiation on the emeraldine (EM) base form of polyaniline was investigated. The processes of γ-ray, UV, and thermally-induced graft copolymerization of EM base with acrylic acid (AAc) in a number of solvents and co-solvents were compared in an attempt to prepare a water-soluble EM through N-acylation. The presence of N-acylation was investigated by thermogravimetric (TG) analysis, Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy, and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). In all cases, the graft concentration and the resulting surface conductivity were shown to be a function of the monomer concentration. The thermostability and weight loss behavior of the graft-copolymerized EM included those that were characteristic of the EM base, the AAc polymer and the amide polymer. Some of the graft-modified EM base samples exhibited good water solubility. In particular, the γ-ray-induced graft copolymerization of EM with AAc in N-methyl-2-pyrrolidimone(NMP)/water co-solvent readily gave rise to a water-soluble, self-protonated and semi-conductive EM, which could be cast into free-standing films from an aqueous solution.
Source Title: Macromolecular Chemistry and Physics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/66902
ISSN: 10221352
DOI: 10.1002/1521-3935(20010301)202:6<785
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