Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-947X(2006)132:6(449)
DC FieldValue
dc.titleTransverse pavement grooving against hydroplaning. II: Design
dc.contributor.authorFwa, T.F.
dc.contributor.authorOng, G.P.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-17T08:26:56Z
dc.date.available2014-06-17T08:26:56Z
dc.date.issued2006-06
dc.identifier.citationFwa, T.F., Ong, G.P. (2006-06). Transverse pavement grooving against hydroplaning. II: Design. Journal of Transportation Engineering 132 (6) : 449-457. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-947X(2006)132:6(449)
dc.identifier.issn0733947X
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/66333
dc.description.abstractThis paper analyzes the effect of groove dimensions (width, depth, and spacing) of transversely grooved pavement surface on hydroplaning using a three-dimensional finite-volume hydroplaning simulation model. Groove widths varying from 2 to 10 mm, groove depths from 1 to 10 mm, and center-to-center spacings from 5 to 25 mm are examined. The effectiveness of a pavement groove design against hydroplaning can be assessed by its ability to raise the hydroplaning speed, which is the vehicle speed at which hydroplaning occurs. It is found that the hydroplaning speed can be raised by increasing the groove depth and width, and decreasing the groove spacing, thereby reducing the risk of hydroplaning occurrence. Among the three groove dimensions (i.e., width, depth, and spacing), changes in groove width is found to have the most significant effect, followed by groove spacing and groove depth. This paper next proposes an analytical procedure for the design of transverse pavement grooving using the simulation model based on the concept of risks of hydroplaning. An illustration of the proposed design procedure is presented in this paper, using a wet-weather freeway vehicle speed distribution, to determine the transverse pavement grooving designs for different risk levels from 0.001% upward. The design concept also allows one to assess the hydroplaning risk level of an existing transversely grooved pavement surface or a proposed groove design, with known wet-weather traffic speed distribution and water film thickness. © 2006 ASCE.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-947X(2006)132:6(449)
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectComputational fluid dynamics technique
dc.subjectDesign
dc.subjectHydrodynamic pressure
dc.subjectPavements
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentCIVIL ENGINEERING
dc.description.doi10.1061/(ASCE)0733-947X(2006)132:6(449)
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Transportation Engineering
dc.description.volume132
dc.description.issue6
dc.description.page449-457
dc.identifier.isiut000237669400002
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