Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2005)131:1(38)
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dc.titleEffects of weathering on treatment of lead contaminated soils
dc.contributor.authorStanforth, R.
dc.contributor.authorYap, C.-F.
dc.contributor.authorNayar, R.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-17T07:39:38Z
dc.date.available2014-06-17T07:39:38Z
dc.date.issued2005-01
dc.identifier.citationStanforth, R., Yap, C.-F., Nayar, R. (2005-01). Effects of weathering on treatment of lead contaminated soils. Journal of Environmental Engineering 131 (1) : 38-48. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2005)131:1(38)
dc.identifier.issn07339372
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/63795
dc.description.abstractTreatment of lead-contaminated material focuses on the reduction of leached lead concentrations in laboratory leaching tests. There has been little study on the chemical stability of treated materials after waste disposal. To investigate the effects of weathering on several solidification/stabilization chemistries, lead-contaminated soil was treated with various agents (cement, phosphates, dithiocarbamate, calcium hydroxide, calcium carbonate, and metallic iron) and subjected to natural weathering for one year. Lead concentrations and pH values in field percolates and leachates from toxicity characteristic leaching procedure (TCLP) and water leaching tests were used to evaluate changes in the treatment effectiveness. Weathering altered the treatment chemistry of several additives-alkaline additives were neutralized, while reduced additives were oxidized. Lead concentrations in field percolates from the untreated soil were around 1.0 mg/L, and did not vary over one year of weathering time. After one year of weathering, lead concentrations in field percolates from most samples were reduced to low levels (<0.15 mg/L). Weathering also affected lead concentrations in the TCLP and water leach test leachates from the treated wastes. Treated wastes in which the alkaline additives were neutralized or reduced additives oxidized gave higher TCLP lead concentrations after weathering than before, in contrast to the decreasing lead concentrations in the field percolates. Water leaching tests on the alkaline treated wastes had lower lead concentrations after weathering than before. © ASCE.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2005)131:1(38)
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectContamination
dc.subjectLead
dc.subjectSoil treatment
dc.subjectWeathering
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentCHEMICAL & BIOMOLECULAR ENGINEERING
dc.description.doi10.1061/(ASCE)0733-9372(2005)131:1(38)
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Environmental Engineering
dc.description.volume131
dc.description.issue1
dc.description.page38-48
dc.description.codenJOEED
dc.identifier.isiut000225818800006
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