Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/62871
Title: Theory for the determination of backside contact resistance of semiconductor wafers from surface potential measurements
Authors: Tan, L.S. 
Leong, M.S. 
Choo, S.C. 
Issue Date: 6-Apr-1998
Citation: Tan, L.S.,Leong, M.S.,Choo, S.C. (1998-04-06). Theory for the determination of backside contact resistance of semiconductor wafers from surface potential measurements. Solid-State Electronics 42 (4) : 589-594. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: We present a method for the calculation of the potential on the surface of a homogeneous semiconductor slab with a disc source electrode on part of the front surface and a resistive contact over the backside of the entire slab. The imposed boundary condition of a constant potential over the source region gives rise to a pair of dual integral equations, which is transformed into a Fredholm integral equation of the second kind and subsequently solved using a simple numerical integration. The potential distributions on the surface of the slab are calculated for contact-to-semiconductor resistivity ratio in the range of 0 to 1 and for slab thickness ranging from 0.1 to 5x the radius of the disc contact. The results, which are directly applicable to the microelectronic test pattern NBS-3[1], show that there is a strong dependence of the surface potential distribution on the backside contact resistivity. A hitherto used two-dimensional model, with a strip source contact and restricted to the special case of a perfectly conducting backside contact, is shown to provide gross overestimates of the corresponding surface potentials when compared to the present method. © 1998 Elsevier Science Ltd. All rights reserved.
Source Title: Solid-State Electronics
URI: http://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/62871
ISSN: 00381101
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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