Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/58631
DC FieldValue
dc.titlePredictive and diagnostic aspects of a universal thermodynamic model for chillers
dc.contributor.authorGordon, J.M.
dc.contributor.authorNg, K.C.
dc.date.accessioned2014-06-17T05:16:40Z
dc.date.available2014-06-17T05:16:40Z
dc.date.issued1995-03
dc.identifier.citationGordon, J.M.,Ng, K.C. (1995-03). Predictive and diagnostic aspects of a universal thermodynamic model for chillers. International Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer 38 (5) : 807-818. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.issn00179310
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/58631
dc.description.abstractThere are fundamental aspects of chiller behavior-characterized by the chiller coefficient of performance as a function of cooling rate and coolant temperatures-that pertain to all refrigeration devices. We review, further develop, and validate against extensive experimental measurements a simple thermodynamic model that captures the universal aspects of chiller behavior. The model provides a procedure for predicting chiller performance over a broad range of operating conditions from a small number of selected measurements, as well as a diagnostic tool. The accuracy of the model is illustrated for reciprocating, centrifugal and absorption chillers. Universal aspects of chiller behavior are further illustrated with less conventional small-scale cooling devices such as thermoacoustic and thermoelectric chillers. © 1995.
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentMECHANICAL & PRODUCTION ENGINEERING
dc.description.sourcetitleInternational Journal of Heat and Mass Transfer
dc.description.volume38
dc.description.issue5
dc.description.page807-818
dc.description.codenIJHMA
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
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