Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.07.029
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dc.titleAssessment of facial golden proportions among young Japanese women
dc.contributor.authorMizumoto, Y.
dc.contributor.authorDeguchi Sr., T.
dc.contributor.authorFong, K.W.C.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-16T05:36:04Z
dc.date.available2013-10-16T05:36:04Z
dc.date.issued2009
dc.identifier.citationMizumoto, Y., Deguchi Sr., T., Fong, K.W.C. (2009). Assessment of facial golden proportions among young Japanese women. American Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics 136 (2) : 168-174. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.07.029
dc.identifier.issn08895406
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/46683
dc.description.abstractIntroduction: Facial proportions are of interest in orthodontics. The null hypothesis is that there is no difference in golden proportions of the soft-tissue facial balance between Japanese and white women. Methods: Facial proportions were assessed by examining photographs of 3 groups of Asian women: group 1, 30 young adult patients with a skeletal Class 1 occlusion; group 2, 30 models; and group 3, 14 popular actresses. Photographic prints or slides were digitized for image analysis. Group 1 subjects had standardized photos taken as part of their treatment. Photos of the subjects in groups 2 and 3 were collected from magazines and other sources and were of varying sizes; therefore, the output image size was not considered. The range of measurement errors was 0.17% to 1.16%. ANOVA was selected because the data set was normally distributed with homogeneous variances. Results: The subjects in the 3 groups showed good total facial proportions. The proportions of the face-height components in group 1 were similar to the golden proportion, which indicated a longer, lower facial height and shorter nose. Group 2 differed from the golden proportion, with a short, lower facial height. Group 3 had golden proportions in all 7 measurements. The proportion of the face width deviated from the golden proportion, indicating a small mouth or wide-set eyes in groups 1 and 2. Conclusions: The null hypothesis was verified in the group 3 actresses in the facial height components. Some measurements in groups 1 and 2 showed different facial proportions that deviated from the golden proportion (ratio). © 2009 American Association of Orthodontists.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.07.029
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentPREVENTIVE DENTISTRY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.ajodo.2007.07.029
dc.description.sourcetitleAmerican Journal of Orthodontics and Dentofacial Orthopedics
dc.description.volume136
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page168-174
dc.description.codenAJOOE
dc.identifier.isiut000268625800014
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