Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/46371
DC FieldValue
dc.titleA computational fluid dynamic simulation study of a smoke extract system in an underground transit station
dc.contributor.authorChew, M.Y.L.
dc.contributor.authorLim, S.H.
dc.date.accessioned2013-10-16T02:00:03Z
dc.date.available2013-10-16T02:00:03Z
dc.date.issued1999
dc.identifier.citationChew, M.Y.L., Lim, S.H. (1999). A computational fluid dynamic simulation study of a smoke extract system in an underground transit station. Journal of Applied Fire Science 9 (3) : 251-273. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
dc.identifier.issn10444300
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/46371
dc.description.abstractA computational fluid dynamics (CFD) model based on PHOENICS has been used to evaluate the distribution of fire induced air flow, temperature and smoke concentration in an underground transit station. Three cases were simulated to study how the underground transit station's smoke extract system cope with a 1 MW of 6 m perimeter baggage fire at three different locations. Each case was studied at 4, 6, 10, and 15 minutes after fire ignition. The results obtained were compared with the theoretical and empirical formulae and guidelines established by Building Research Establishments (BRE) which were meant for conventional buildings. The 4 and 6 minute results were also used to study whether the station can comply with NFPA 130's exiting requirements of providing a tenable environmental condition for passengers' evacuation. In addition, the simulation results after 10 minutes were used to evaluate the environmental condition of the station when firemen enter the station for fire fighting. Results from the simulations showed that the underground transit station could comply with the NFPA 130's exiting requirements for providing a tenable environmental condition for passengers' evacuation. However, simulation results for one of the cases, i.e., Case 3, indicated that the station's environmental condition was unsafe for humans after 10 minutes from ignition due to stratification phenomenon. © 2000, Baywood Publishing Co., Inc.
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentSCHOOL OF BUILDING & REAL ESTATE
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Applied Fire Science
dc.description.volume9
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.page251-273
dc.description.codenJFSCE
dc.identifier.isiutNOT_IN_WOS
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

Show simple item record
Files in This Item:
There are no files associated with this item.

Page view(s)

163
checked on Jan 20, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.