Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/0885-4505(90)90063-7
DC FieldValue
dc.titleEffect of dietary palm oil on lipoprotein lipases: Lipoprotein levels and tissue lipids in rat
dc.contributor.authorPereira, T.A.
dc.contributor.authorSinniah, R.
dc.contributor.authorDas, N.P.
dc.date.accessioned2012-02-01T09:15:41Z
dc.date.available2012-02-01T09:15:41Z
dc.date.issued1990
dc.identifier.citationPereira, T.A., Sinniah, R., Das, N.P. (1990). Effect of dietary palm oil on lipoprotein lipases: Lipoprotein levels and tissue lipids in rat. Biochemical Medicine and Metabolic Biology 44 (3) : 207-217. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/0885-4505(90)90063-7
dc.identifier.issn08854505
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/30497
dc.description.abstractThe aims of our study were to investigate the effect of dietary palm oil on the levels of lipoprotein lipase, hepatic lipase, fat distribution (in the aorta and liver), and total cholesterol, HDL, LDL, and triacylglycerol levels in young rats (70 g body wt) over a period of 10 weeks. Palm oil-fed rats showed higher growth rate and lower triacylglycerol levels than the control group. Hepatic lipase activity was correlated to the liver fat distribution (correlation coefficient, r = +0.682) as seen by histopathological sections and was similar for both the palm oil and the control diets. Palm oil-fed rats exhibited a significantly higher HDL cholesterol to total plasma cholesterol ratio when compared to animals fed the control diet. The triacylglycerol levels correlated inversely to the HDL cholesterol levels (r = -0.536) while the lipoprotein lipase (LPL) activity correlated directly to the LDL level (r = +0.617) for both groups of animals. The fatty acid profiles of adipose and liver tissues and plasma revealed that saturated fatty acids - palmitic and stearic - were preferentially incorporated in liver and adipose tissues and less in the plasma. This accounts for lack of deposition in the arterial wall and for the antithrombotic tendency of palm oil. Thus, our present findings suggest that dietary palm oil may not contribute to the risk for coronary heart disease.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/0885-4505(90)90063-7
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentBIOCHEMISTRY
dc.contributor.departmentPATHOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1016/0885-4505(90)90063-7
dc.description.sourcetitleBiochemical Medicine and Metabolic Biology
dc.description.volume44
dc.description.issue3
dc.description.page207-217
dc.description.codenBMMBE
dc.identifier.isiutA1990EN31100002
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