Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2004.01.035
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dc.titleDoes refractive error influence the association of blood pressure and retinal vessel diameters? The Blue Mountains Eye Study
dc.contributor.authorWong, T.Y.
dc.contributor.authorWang, J.J.
dc.contributor.authorRochtchina, E.
dc.contributor.authorMitchell, P.
dc.contributor.authorKlein, R.
dc.date.accessioned2011-11-30T02:05:52Z
dc.date.available2011-11-30T02:05:52Z
dc.date.issued2004
dc.identifier.citationWong, T.Y., Wang, J.J., Rochtchina, E., Mitchell, P., Klein, R. (2004). Does refractive error influence the association of blood pressure and retinal vessel diameters? The Blue Mountains Eye Study. American Journal of Ophthalmology 137 (6) : 1050-1055. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2004.01.035
dc.identifier.issn00029394
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/29152
dc.description.abstractPurpose To determine if refractive errors influence the association of blood pressure and retinal vessel diameters. Design Population-based, cross-sectional study. Methods Retinal photographs from the right eyes of participants (n = 3,654, aged 49+ years) in the Blue Mountains Eye Study taken during baseline examinations (1992 to 1994) were digitized. The diameter of all retinal vessels located half to one disk diameter from the disk margin was measured using a computer-assisted imaging program. These measurements were combined to provide the average diameters of retinal arterioles and venules of that eye, and the ratio of their diameters, the arteriole-to-venule ratio (AVR). The association of blood pressure and retinal vessel diameters was analyzed before and after correction for refraction using the Bengtsson formula. Results Before correction, each 10-mm Hg increase in mean arterial blood pressure was associated with a 3.7-μm (95% confidence interval [CI], 3.2-4.3) decrease in arteriolar diameter and a 0.9-μm (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) decrease in venular diameter. After correction for refraction, each 1-mm Hg increase in mean arterial blood pressure was associated with a 3.7-μm (95% CI, 3.2-4.2) decrease in arteriolar diameter and a 0.8-μm (95% CI, 0.3-0.9) decrease in venular diameter. Refraction was not associated with the AVR and had no effect on the association of blood pressure and AVR. Conclusion Refraction had no appreciable effect on the association of blood pressure and retinal vessel diameters or on the AVR. Correction for refraction is important for quantifying absolute retinal vessel caliber, but may not be particularly important in epidemiologic studies investigating the association of generalized retinal arteriolar narrowing and hypertension. © 2004 by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2004.01.035
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentOPHTHALMOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.ajo.2004.01.035
dc.description.sourcetitleAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
dc.description.volume137
dc.description.issue6
dc.description.page1050-1055
dc.description.codenAJOPA
dc.identifier.isiut000222010600010
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