Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2005.12.008
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dc.titleDetection of Narrow Angles and Established Angle Closure In Chinese Residents of Singapore: Potential Screening Tests
dc.contributor.authorNolan, W.P.
dc.contributor.authorAung, T.
dc.contributor.authorKhaw, P.T.
dc.contributor.authorJohnson, G.J.
dc.contributor.authorFoster, P.J.
dc.contributor.authorSeah, S.K.L.
dc.contributor.authorMachin, D.
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-26T09:05:16Z
dc.date.available2011-09-26T09:05:16Z
dc.date.issued2006
dc.identifier.citationNolan, W.P., Aung, T., Khaw, P.T., Johnson, G.J., Foster, P.J., Seah, S.K.L., Machin, D. (2006). Detection of Narrow Angles and Established Angle Closure In Chinese Residents of Singapore: Potential Screening Tests. American Journal of Ophthalmology 141 (5) : 896-901. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2005.12.008
dc.identifier.issn00029394
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/26496
dc.description.abstractPurpose: To assess the performance of peripheral and central anterior chamber depth (ACD) measurements, and autorefraction, in identifying Chinese people with occludable drainage angles or established primary angle closure. Design: Population-based cross-sectional analysis. Methods: Subjects aged 40 years and older were drawn from a representative sample of Chinese Singaporean residents. Limbal chamber depth (LCD) was estimated and central ACD was measured using optical pachymetry and ultrasound. An autorefraction was taken for all subjects. Angle width and the presence of peripheral anterior synechiae were determined by gonioscopy. Receiver operating characteristic curves were generated to show the performance of these tests in detecting occludable angles. Results: A total of 1090 subjects were examined. The prevalence of occludable angles was 6.5%. LCD measurement performed best in detecting occludable angles (area under the curve [AUC] 0.904, 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.870, 0.937). Optical pachymetry and ultrasound measurement of ACD performed less well (AUC 0.859 and 0.810, respectively), and autorefraction performed poorly in detecting occludable angles (AUC 0.632). LCD also gave the best performance in detecting primary angle closure (AUC 0.782, 95% CI 0.727, 0.837). Conclusions: Limbal LCD estimation outperforms other methods of measuring ACD as a screening tool for the detection of occludable drainage angles in the Chinese population of Singapore. © 2006 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.ajo.2005.12.008
dc.sourceScopus
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentOPHTHALMOLOGY
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.ajo.2005.12.008
dc.description.sourcetitleAmerican Journal of Ophthalmology
dc.description.volume141
dc.description.issue5
dc.description.page896-901
dc.identifier.isiut000237598300015
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