Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.006
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dc.titleDevelopment and psychometric testing of the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey (CLOCS)
dc.contributor.authorHenderson, A.
dc.contributor.authorCreedy, D.
dc.contributor.authorBoorman, R.
dc.contributor.authorCooke, M.
dc.contributor.authorWalker, R.
dc.date.accessioned2011-09-21T09:32:23Z
dc.date.available2011-09-21T09:32:23Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationHenderson, A., Creedy, D., Boorman, R., Cooke, M., Walker, R. (2010). Development and psychometric testing of the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey (CLOCS). Nurse Education Today 30 (7) : 598-602  . ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.006
dc.identifier.issn02606917
dc.identifier.issn15322793
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/26368
dc.description.abstractAim: This paper describes the development and psychometric testing of the Clinical Learning Organisational Culture Survey (CLOCS) that measures prevailing beliefs and assumptions important for learning to occur in the workplace. Method: Items from a tool that measured motivation in workplace learning were adapted to the nursing practice context. The tool was tested in the clinical setting, and then further modified to enhance face and content validity. Participants: Registered nurses (329) across three major Australian health facilities were surveyed between June 2007 and September 2007. Data analysis: An exploratory factor analysis identified five concepts - recognition, dissatisfaction, affiliation, accomplishment, and influence. Validity and reliability: Internal consistency measures of reliability revealed that four concepts had good internal consistency: recognition (α = .914), dissatisfaction (α = .771), affiliation (α = .801), accomplishment (α = .664), but less so for influence (α = .529). Results: This tool effectively measures recognition, affiliation and accomplishment - three concepts important for learning in practice situations, as well as dissatisfied staff across all these domains. Testing of additional influence items identify that this concept is difficult to delineate. Conclusion: The CLOCS can effectively inform leaders about concepts inherent in the culture important for maximising learning by staff. Crown Copyright © 2009.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.006
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectInstrument development
dc.subjectNurse education
dc.subjectOrganisational development
dc.subjectStaff development
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentNURSING/ALICE LEE CTR FOR NURSING STUD
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.nedt.2009.12.006
dc.description.sourcetitleNurse Education Today
dc.description.volume30
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page598-602  
dc.identifier.isiut000282530600002
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications

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