Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.08.038
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dc.titleDirect contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact
dc.contributor.authorYeow, C.H.
dc.contributor.authorGoh, J.C.H.
dc.contributor.authorLee, P.V.S.
dc.date.accessioned2011-08-03T01:51:16Z
dc.date.available2011-08-03T01:51:16Z
dc.date.issued2010
dc.identifier.citationYeow, C.H., Goh, J.C.H., Lee, P.V.S. (2010). Direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact. Journal of Biomechanics 43 (2) : 242-247. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.08.038
dc.identifier.issn00219290
dc.identifier.urihttp://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/25342
dc.description.abstractAnterior tibial loading is a major factor involved in the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) injury mechanism during ski impact landing. We sought to investigate the direct contribution of axial impact compressive load to anterior tibial load during simulated ski landing impact of intact knee joints without quadriceps activation. Twelve porcine knee specimens were procured. Four specimens were used as non-impact control while the remaining eight were mounted onto a material-testing system at 70° flexion and subjected to simulated landing impact, which was successively repeated with incremental actuator displacement. Four specimens from the impacted group underwent pre-impact MRI for tibial plateau angle measurements while the other four were subjected to histology and microCT for cartilage morphology and volume assessment. The tibial plateau angles ranged from 29.4 to 38.8°. There was a moderate linear relationship (Y=0.16X; R2=0.64; p<0.001) between peak axial impact compressive load (Y) and peak anterior tibial load (X). The anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group sustained surface cartilage fraying, superficial clefts and tidemark disruption, compared to the control group. MicroCT scans displayed visible cartilage deformation for both anterior and posterior regions in the impacted group. Due to the tibial plateau angle, increased axial impact compressive load can directly elevate anterior tibial load and hence contribute to ACL failure during simulated landing impact. Axial impact compressive load resulted in shear cartilage damage along anterior-posterior tibial plateau regions, due to its contribution to anterior tibial loading. This mechanism plays an important role in elevating ACL stress and cartilage deformation during impact landing. © 2009 Elsevier Ltd.
dc.description.urihttp://libproxy1.nus.edu.sg/login?url=http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.08.038
dc.sourceScopus
dc.subjectAnterior cruciate ligament
dc.subjectAnterior tibial load
dc.subjectCartilage lesion
dc.subjectImpact landing
dc.subjectPeak axial impact compressive load
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentORTHOPAEDIC SURGERY
dc.contributor.departmentLIFE SCIENCES INSTITUTE
dc.description.doi10.1016/j.jbiomech.2009.08.038
dc.description.sourcetitleJournal of Biomechanics
dc.description.volume43
dc.description.issue2
dc.description.page242-247
dc.identifier.isiut000274499900009
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