Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL096069
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dc.titleUrban Water Storage Capacity Inferred From Observed Evapotranspiration Recession
dc.contributor.authorJongen, HJ
dc.contributor.authorSteeneveld, GJ
dc.contributor.authorBeringer, J
dc.contributor.authorChristen, A
dc.contributor.authorChrysoulakis, N
dc.contributor.authorFortuniak, K
dc.contributor.authorHong, J
dc.contributor.authorHong, JW
dc.contributor.authorJacobs, CMJ
dc.contributor.authorJarvi, L
dc.contributor.authorMeier, F
dc.contributor.authorPawlak, W
dc.contributor.authorRoth, M
dc.contributor.authorTheeuwes, NE
dc.contributor.authorVelasco, E
dc.contributor.authorVogt, R
dc.contributor.authorTeuling, AJ
dc.date.accessioned2023-06-22T07:03:25Z
dc.date.available2023-06-22T07:03:25Z
dc.date.issued2022-02-16
dc.identifier.citationJongen, HJ, Steeneveld, GJ, Beringer, J, Christen, A, Chrysoulakis, N, Fortuniak, K, Hong, J, Hong, JW, Jacobs, CMJ, Jarvi, L, Meier, F, Pawlak, W, Roth, M, Theeuwes, NE, Velasco, E, Vogt, R, Teuling, AJ (2022-02-16). Urban Water Storage Capacity Inferred From Observed Evapotranspiration Recession. GEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS 49 (3). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1029/2021GL096069
dc.identifier.issn0094-8276
dc.identifier.issn1944-8007
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/242317
dc.description.abstractWater storage plays an important role in mitigating heat and flooding in urban areas. Assessment of the water storage capacity of cities remains challenging due to the inherent heterogeneity of the urban surface. Traditionally, effective storage has been estimated from runoff. Here, we present a novel approach to estimate effective water storage capacity from recession rates of observed evaporation during precipitation-free periods. We test this approach for cities at neighborhood scale with eddy-covariance based latent heat flux observations from 14 contrasting sites with different local climate zones, vegetation cover and characteristics, and climates. Based on analysis of 583 drydowns, we find storage capacities to vary between 1.3 and 28.4 mm, corresponding to e-folding timescales of 1.8–20.1 days. This makes the urban storage capacity at least five times smaller than all the observed values for natural ecosystems, reflecting an evaporation regime characterized by extreme water limitation.
dc.language.isoen
dc.publisherAMER GEOPHYSICAL UNION
dc.sourceElements
dc.subjectScience & Technology
dc.subjectPhysical Sciences
dc.subjectGeosciences, Multidisciplinary
dc.subjectGeology
dc.subjecturban climate
dc.subjectrecession analysis
dc.subjectEDDY COVARIANCE MEASUREMENTS
dc.subjectENERGY-BALANCE
dc.subjectCARBON-DIOXIDE
dc.subjectHEAT-ISLAND
dc.subjectCLIMATE-CHANGE
dc.subjectLOCAL CLIMATE
dc.subjectCO2 EXCHANGE
dc.subjectVEGETATION
dc.subjectIMPACT
dc.subjectFLUX
dc.typeArticle
dc.date.updated2023-06-22T05:04:39Z
dc.contributor.departmentGEOGRAPHY
dc.description.doi10.1029/2021GL096069
dc.description.sourcetitleGEOPHYSICAL RESEARCH LETTERS
dc.description.volume49
dc.description.issue3
dc.published.statePublished
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