Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1177/20420986211030371
Title: Inappropriate medications and physical function: a systematic review
Authors: Manias, Elizabeth
Kabir, Md Zunayed
Maier, Andrea B 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Life Sciences & Biomedicine
Pharmacology & Pharmacy
activities of daily living
aged
functional independence
independent living
medication therapy management
physical function
OLDER PERSONS
DRUG-USE
ANTICHOLINERGIC BURDEN
HEALTH OUTCOMES
BEERS CRITERIA
GERIATRIC-PATIENTS
ELDERLY-PEOPLE
ADULTS
POPULATION
PREVALENCE
Issue Date: 1-Jul-2021
Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS LTD
Citation: Manias, Elizabeth, Kabir, Md Zunayed, Maier, Andrea B (2021-07-01). Inappropriate medications and physical function: a systematic review. THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES IN DRUG SAFETY 12. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1177/20420986211030371
Abstract: Background and aims: Inappropriate medication prescription is highly prevalent in older adults and is associated with adverse health outcomes. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between potentially inappropriate medications (PIMS) and potential prescribing omissions with physical function in older adults situated in diverse environments. Methods: A systematic search was completed using the following databases: MEDLINE, CINAHL, PsycINFO, EMBASE and COCHRANE. Results were extracted from the included studies. Results: In total, 55 studies reported on 2,767,594 participants with a mean age of 77.1 years (63.5% women). Study designs comprised 26 retrospective cohort studies, 21 prospective cohort studies and 8 cross-sectional studies. Inappropriate medications in community and hospital settings were significantly associated with higher risk of falls (21 out of 30 studies), higher risk of fractures (7 out of 9 studies), impaired activities of daily living (ADL; 8 out of 10 studies) and impaired instrumental ADL (IADL) score (4 out of 6 studies). Five out of seven studies also showed that PIMs were associated with poorer physical performance comprising the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, grip strength, time to functional recovery, functional independence and scale of functioning. Many medication classes were implicated as PIMs in falls, fractures and impairment in physical performance including antipsychotic, sedative, anti-anxiety, anticholinergic, antidiabetic, opioid and antihypertensive medications. For patients not receiving musculoskeletal medications, such as calcium, vitamin D and bisphosphonates, older adults were found to be at risk of a hospital admission for a fall or fracture. Conclusion: Inappropriate medication prescriptions are associated with impaired physical function across longitudinal and cross-sectional studies in older adults situated in diverse settings. It is important to support older people to reduce their use of inappropriate medications and prevent prescribing omissions. Plain language summary: Inappropriate medications and physical function Background and aims: The use of inappropriate medications is very common in older adults and is associated with harmful health problems. The aim was to examine associations between potentially inappropriate medications and potential prescribing omissions with physical function in older adults situated in diverse environments. Methods: Library databases were examined for possible studies to include and a systematic search was completed. Relevant information was obtained from the included studies. Results: In total, 55 studies reported on 2,767,594 participants who were an average age of 77.1 years and about 6 out of 10 were women. A variety of different study designs were used. Inappropriate medication prescriptions in community and hospital settings were significantly associated with higher risk of falls (21 out of 30 studies), higher risk of fractures (7 out of 9 studies), problems with activities of daily living (ADL), such as eating, bathing, dressing, grooming, walking and toileting (8 out of 10 studies) and problems with instrumental ADL such as managing medications, house cleaning and shopping (4 out of 6 studies). Five out of seven studies also showed that inappropriate medications were associated with poorer physical performance involving the Timed Up and Go test, walking speed, grip strength, time to functional recovery, functional independence and scale of functioning. Many types of medication classes were shown to be associated with a risk of falls, fractures and problems with physical performance. Omitted medications were also associated with falls and fractures. Conclusion: Inappropriate medication prescriptions are associated with problems relating to physical function. It is important to support older people to reduce their use of inappropriate medications and prevent prescribing omissions.
Source Title: THERAPEUTIC ADVANCES IN DRUG SAFETY
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234877
ISSN: 2042-0986
2042-0994
DOI: 10.1177/20420986211030371
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