Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234319
Title: 'UNIFORM SYNDROME' OF SUBURBAN SHOPPING MALLS IN SINGAPORE
Authors: SEE WEE HENG
Issue Date: 2006
Citation: SEE WEE HENG (2006). 'UNIFORM SYNDROME' OF SUBURBAN SHOPPING MALLS IN SINGAPORE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: This dissertation seeks to validate claims that local suburban shopping malls are experiencing a phenomenon known as 'uniform syndrome'. Statistical results from correlation studies in terms of trade allocation proportions, tenant brands recurrence frequency as well as level theme comparison have strongly supported the hypothesis that suburban malls are indeed experiencing 'uniform syndrome'. The consumer perception survey has also verified suburban shoppers' perceptions on the existence of uniformity among the suburban malls. It has also been proven that Capitaland Retail, Centrepoint Properties as well as Retail Mall Management are indeed producing suburban malls of the 'genes' given their high degree of uniformity. Although findings have shown that some form of uniformity is inevitable as all suburban malls aspire to provide a convenient one stop shopping location through comprehensive trade coverage, the implications of uniformity should not be taken lightly. Failure to address the syndrome at its initiate stages might lead to higher degree of uniformity in the near future as more and more suburban malls go under the management of retail property trust. It is however comforting to observe that mall managements are making efforts to specialize in certain trades on the 3rd and 4th retail level so as to differentiate their malls from others. The degree of uniformity can be significantly reduced so long as close trade allocation coordination with HDB shops and other nearby suburban malls are practised to provide more competitive products and services comparable to the downtown malls.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/234319
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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