Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312299
Title: Mental, physical and social functioning in independently living senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults
Authors: Lahti, Anna-Maria
Mikkola, Tuija M.
Salonen, Minna
Wasenius, Niko
Sarvimäki, Anneli
Eriksson, Johan G. 
Von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B.
Keywords: Loneliness
Mental functioning
Older people
Physical functioning
Senior housing
Social contacts
Issue Date: 23-Nov-2021
Publisher: MDPI
Citation: Lahti, Anna-Maria, Mikkola, Tuija M., Salonen, Minna, Wasenius, Niko, Sarvimäki, Anneli, Eriksson, Johan G., Von Bonsdorff, Mikaela B. (2021-11-23). Mental, physical and social functioning in independently living senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults. International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health 18 (23) : 12299. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/ijerph182312299
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
Abstract: Senior houses provide social interaction and support, potentially supporting older peo-ple’s physical and mental functioning. Few studies have investigated functioning of senior house residents. The aim was to compare functioning between senior house residents and community-dwelling older adults in Finland. We compared senior house residents (n = 336, 69% women, mean age 83 years) to community-dwelling older adults (n = 1139, 56% women, mean age 74 years). Physical and mental functioning were assessed using the SF 36-Item Health Survey. Loneliness and frequency of social contacts were self-reported. The analyses were adjusted for age, socioeconomic factors and diseases. Physical functioning was lower among men in senior houses compared to community-dwelling men (mean 41.1 vs. 46.4, p = 0.003). Mental functioning or the frequency of social contacts did not differ between type of residence in either sex. Loneliness was higher among women in senior houses compared to community-dwelling women (OR = 1.67, p = 0.027). This was not observed in men. Results suggest that women in senior houses had similar physical and mental functioning compared to community-dwelling women. Male senior house residents had poorer physical functioning compared to community-dwelling men. Women living in senior houses were lonelier than community-dwelling women despite the social environment. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
Source Title: International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/232693
ISSN: 1661-7827
DOI: 10.3390/ijerph182312299
Rights: Attribution 4.0 International
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