Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071659
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dc.titleEnergy content and nutrient profiles of frequently consumed meals in singapore
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Penny Liu Qing
dc.contributor.authorBi, Xinyan
dc.contributor.authorYeo, Michelle Ting Yun
dc.contributor.authorHenry, Christiani Jeyakumar
dc.date.accessioned2022-10-11T07:56:00Z
dc.date.available2022-10-11T07:56:00Z
dc.date.issued2021-07-19
dc.identifier.citationYeo, Penny Liu Qing, Bi, Xinyan, Yeo, Michelle Ting Yun, Henry, Christiani Jeyakumar (2021-07-19). Energy content and nutrient profiles of frequently consumed meals in singapore. Foods 10 (7) : 1659. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.3390/foods10071659
dc.identifier.issn2304-8158
dc.identifier.urihttps://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/232056
dc.description.abstractSingapore is a multi-ethnic country with a great variety of traditional ethnic cuisines. In this modern society where there is an increasing prevalence of obesity, it is important to know the nutritional content and energy density of our foods. However, there have been little data on the nutritional content of our local foods. The energy density and nutrient content of 45 commonly consumed meals by three ethnic groups in Singapore (Chinese, Malay, and Indian) were assessed in this study. Chinese, Malay, and Indian cuisines had an average energy density of 661, 652, and 723 kJ/100 g, respectively. Moreover, the macronutrient content is different between the different ethnic groups. Compared to Chinese and Malay cuisines, Indian cuisine contained lower protein but higher fat and carbohydrate content (p = 0.03). From the mineral analysis of the ethnic foods, we found out that Chinese cuisines contain significantly higher sodium (average of 238 mg/100 g) than Malay cuisines (p = 0.006) and Indian cuisines (p = 0.03). Knowing the caloric density and nutrition content of local ethnic foods may aid hawkers and government officials in developing healthier options to tackle Singapore’s obesity epidemic. © 2021 by the authors. Licensee MDPI, Basel, Switzerland.
dc.publisherMDPI AG
dc.rightsAttribution 4.0 International
dc.rights.urihttps://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/
dc.sourceScopus OA2021
dc.subjectCalorie answer
dc.subjectEnergy content
dc.subjectEthnic cuisines
dc.subjectInductively coupled plasma mass spectroscopy (ICP-MS)
dc.subjectNutrient profiles
dc.typeArticle
dc.contributor.departmentDEPT OF BIOCHEMISTRY
dc.description.doi10.3390/foods10071659
dc.description.sourcetitleFoods
dc.description.volume10
dc.description.issue7
dc.description.page1659
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