Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/230938
Title: PERCEPTION OF HIGH-RISE LIVING FROM THE LOW-RISE
Authors: CHEW KING MUN
Keywords: High-rise
Public housing
Low-rise residents' perception
Issue Date: 2005
Citation: CHEW KING MUN (2005). PERCEPTION OF HIGH-RISE LIVING FROM THE LOW-RISE. ScholarBank@NUS Repository.
Abstract: Singapore has been facing immense challenge in overcoming the problem of land scarcity. With a land area of only 682.7 km , it is certainly not enough to accommodate the increasing demands from various competing land uses, and one such increasing demand is housing. In the Concept Plan 2001, the Urban Redevelopment Authority estimated that Singapore would need 800 000 more homes to accommodate a projected population of 5.5 million. Hence, taller buildings and higher proportion of high-density housing are proposed in the plan to ensure sufficient land resources for other competing needs. This paper provides an insight into the residents' perception, attitudes, concerns and acceptability towards high-rise (25th storey and above) public housing development, so that it may help avoid situations of oversupply of a particular housing type. Unlike other studies of similar nature, this study focuses on interviewing the low-rise residents. Findings reveal that majority of low-rise residents regardless of their dwelling type still prefer low-rise living to other housing types, and only 32.4% of the residents interviewed would choose to live on 25th storey and above. The perceived 3 main attractions of such high-rise housing development are the better view, stronger breeze and better air quality it offers in contrast to the 3 major concerns such as lifts breakdown, ease of escape in the event of emergency, and whether elderly would like it or not. The 3 most appealing factors for low-rise are: ease of escape in the event of emergency, ease of getting out of the building if lifts broke down, and the ability to suit the preference of elderly.
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/230938
Appears in Collections:Bachelor's Theses

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