Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206320979658
Title: Learning from the Past: How Prior Experience Impacts the Value of Innovation After Scientist Relocation
Authors: Jain, Amit 
Huang, Kenneth G
Keywords: Social Sciences
Business
Psychology, Applied
Management
Business & Economics
Psychology
innovation
management
mobility organizational learning
knowledge management
Issue Date: 30-Dec-2020
Publisher: SAGE PUBLICATIONS INC
Citation: Jain, Amit, Huang, Kenneth G (2020-12-30). Learning from the Past: How Prior Experience Impacts the Value of Innovation After Scientist Relocation. JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT 48 (3) : 571-604. ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1177/0149206320979658
Abstract: There is growing interest in management and organizational research to study the relocation of knowledge workers, defined as a move by the knowledge worker to a different place of work. Relocation has been well studied as a potential source of losses or gains in human and social capital. However, our understanding of whether and how it disrupts a scientist’s innovation activities is limited. Relocation could disrupt innovation activities in the new workplace by making it difficult for a scientist to coordinate work with prior collaborators with whom the scientist has relational experience and forcing the scientist to work with new collaborators. In this study, we develop a conceptual framework assessing the effectiveness of the scientists’ research and development (R&D) experience to counter these disruptions arising from relocation and develop valuable patented innovations. We hypothesize that both the scientist’s relational experience and working with new collaborators decrease the value of innovations the scientist creates after relocation. Scientist R&D experience, however, is double-edged in nature: It leads to less valuable innovations prior to relocation but facilitates the creation of more valuable innovations after it. Our theory suggests that this is because R&D experience facilitates the scientist’s adaptation to the new context and helps coordinate her or his activities in new collaborations. Nevertheless, R&D experience is less effective in sustaining the efficacy of relational experience with prior collaborators after relocation. Using a longitudinal dataset from the knowledge-intensive genomics industry, we find support for our hypotheses. This study yields important managerial and policy implications.
Source Title: JOURNAL OF MANAGEMENT
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/229203
ISSN: 01492063
15571211
DOI: 10.1177/0149206320979658
Appears in Collections:Staff Publications
Elements

Show full item record
Files in This Item:
File Description SizeFormatAccess SettingsVersion 
2020-JainKenneth.pdfAccepted version193.3 kBAdobe PDF

OPEN

Post-printView/Download

SCOPUSTM   
Citations

2
checked on Sep 23, 2022

Page view(s)

20
checked on Sep 22, 2022

Download(s)

1
checked on Sep 22, 2022

Google ScholarTM

Check

Altmetric


Items in DSpace are protected by copyright, with all rights reserved, unless otherwise indicated.