Please use this identifier to cite or link to this item: https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2114271119
Title: Genetics, leadership position, and well-being: An investigation with a large-scale GWAS
Authors: Song, Zhaoli 
Li, Wen-Dong
Jin, Xuye
Ying, Junbiao
Zhang, Xin 
Song, Ying
Li, Hengtong
Fan, Qiao 
Keywords: Science & Technology
Multidisciplinary Sciences
Science & Technology - Other Topics
GWAS
leadership
well-being
genetics
management
GENOME-WIDE ASSOCIATION
BIPOLAR DISORDER
ROLE OCCUPANCY
RISK-TAKING
PERSONALITY
INTELLIGENCE
HEALTH
DETERMINANTS
METAANALYSIS
PERCEPTIONS
Issue Date: 22-Mar-2022
Publisher: NATL ACAD SCIENCES
Citation: Song, Zhaoli, Li, Wen-Dong, Jin, Xuye, Ying, Junbiao, Zhang, Xin, Song, Ying, Li, Hengtong, Fan, Qiao (2022-03-22). Genetics, leadership position, and well-being: An investigation with a large-scale GWAS. PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA 119 (12). ScholarBank@NUS Repository. https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2114271119
Abstract: Twin studies document leadership role occupancy (e.g., whether one holds formal supervisory or management positions) as a heritable trait. However, previous studies have been underpowered in identifying specific genes associated with this trait, which has limited our understanding of the genetic correlations between leadership and one’s well-being. We conducted a genome-wide association study (GWAS) on individuals’ leadership phenotypes that were derived from supervisory/managerial positions and demands among 248,640 individuals of European ancestry from the UK Biobank data. Among the nine genome-wide significant loci, the identified top regions are pinpointed to previously reported GWAS loci for bipolar disorder (miR-2113/POUSF2 and LINC01239) and schizophrenia loci (ZSWIM6). We found positive genetic correlations between leadership position and several positive well-being and health indicators, including high levels of subjective well-being, and low levels of anxiety and depression (jrgj > 0.2). Intriguingly, we observed positive genetic correlations between leadership position and some negative well-being indicators, including high levels of bipolar disorder and alcohol intake frequency. We also observed positive genetic correlations between leadership position and shortened longevity, cardiovascular diseases, and body mass index after partialing out the genetic variance attributed to either educational attainment or income. The positive genetic correlation between leadership and bipolar disorder seems potentially more pronounced for those holding senior leadership positions (rg: 0.10 to 0.24), partially due to shared genetic variants with educational attainment. Our findings provide insights into the polygenic nature of leadership and shared genetic underpinnings between the leadership position and one’s health and well-being. We caution against simplistic interpretations of our findings as advocating genetic determinism.
Source Title: PROCEEDINGS OF THE NATIONAL ACADEMY OF SCIENCES OF THE UNITED STATES OF AMERICA
URI: https://scholarbank.nus.edu.sg/handle/10635/228802
ISSN: 0027-8424
1091-6490
DOI: 10.1073/pnas.2114271119
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